Chemistry of California Lycium cooperi and Lycium andersonii

Main Article Content

Gerson Navarrete
Axel Bracquemond
Enrique Villasenor
Michelle Wong
James Adams

Abstract

Aims: To examine the chemistry of two California Lycium species and evaluate the possible use of California Lycium species as dietary supplements especially for age related macular degeneration.

Study Design: This exploratory analytical research used samples of Lycium andersonii and Lycium cooperi collected in the field and analyzed in the lab.

Place and Duration of Study: University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA USA 90089.

Methodology: Plant extracts were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with ultraviolet photodiode array detection in order to identify the chemical characteristics of compounds found in the plants.

Results: Several known compounds were found in extracts of Lycium cooperi and Lycium andersonii foliage and fruit including: zeaxanthin, zeaxanthin monopalmitate and β-cryptoxanthin.  The various California species of Lycium are discussed as possible alternatives to Chinese Lycium barbarum.

Conclusion: California Lycium berries may be suitable substitutes for Chinese Lycium berries.

Keywords:
Age related macular degeneration, Lycium, Lycium andersonii, Lycium cooperi, zeaxanthin.

Article Details

How to Cite
Navarrete, G., Bracquemond, A., Villasenor, E., Wong, M., & Adams, J. (2019). Chemistry of California Lycium cooperi and Lycium andersonii. European Journal of Medicinal Plants, 29(3), 1-5. https://doi.org/10.9734/ejmp/2019/v29i330156
Section
Original Research Article

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